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Messages - Red Lester

Pages: [1] 2 3 4
1
Guitars / Re: Again, searching for an acoustic guitar.
« on: January 28, 2015, 06:13:33 PM »
I have a Harptone acoustic single cutaway flat top arched back guitar - purchased from a pawn shop during the latter 1970s.
I love its tone, maybe you would not?, there is one fret, 12th or near, that has a tiny nick big enough to slightly interfere with string action, and there is a little bit of where the varnish is rubbed off around one edge of the sound hole, other than that it is fine condition (not officially 'fine' - has not been assayed by a pro).
I just now changed my profile avatar so the guitar may be seen.  I had no plans to sell the thing (it's my 2nd fave box) but would consider selling it.
http://burlapandblues.com/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;attach=25;type=avatar&time=1422468043

2
Thanks for the tip BH.

3
Anyone have opinions or advice on the following options (for vocal & guitar) ? Thanks.

Behringer UCG102 Guitar Link USB Audio Interface, 1/4 inch to USB ($40 US)

Behringer U-PHORIA UMC22 is an audiophile 2x2 USB audio interface with a MIDAS mic preamplifier. ($80 US)

Behringer U-PHORIA UMC202 like UMC22 above but each input has pre-amp. ($120 US)

Behringer U-PHORIA UMC202HD (might also be known as UMC204) 2x2 USB Audio/MIDI Interface ($100 US)



4
General Discussion / Re: Heading to Arkansas for the weekend (y'all)
« on: July 02, 2014, 02:05:11 PM »
I  love to hear about such father daughter ( or father son) relationships and activities as you all's.  You both are so blessed.

My late father he got himself a perforated eardrum diving in a deep part of lake michigan with no diving gear at all (except for his swim trunks).  (for the rest of his life he whenever he blew his nose, he also blew thru his ear) He was young and not the wisest at the time. he bet his companions that he could hold his breath long enough to get to the bottom and back, he did so and proved it by bringing up some bottom vegetation, well he learned the hard way there is more to diving than how long can you hold your breath. 

Never heard water temperature mentioned along with this story, but it seems like to me he would have been mighty cold by the time he returned to the surface, no matter what the surface temperature was like. 

How deep can you all dive, or for how much time, without wearing a suit that keeps you from getting too cold?

5
General Discussion / Linds'a Place on the Southside
« on: June 25, 2014, 03:31:05 PM »
Ironically, a dude visiting Chicago from his home in France introduced me to a very nice music venue which had previously been unknown to me, A blues-loving Chicago native. It is Linda's Lounge, aka Linda's Place, on the southside. I had a wonderful time there - I had planned to arrive at 930 and leave by 1030 or 11 since I had to rise early the next day, but it was so much fun I stayed until after midnight.
The venue is a neighborhood bar in a predominantly Black area, and the clientele (and most of the musicians) seemed to be from middle-age to elderly, so the music was fit to their tastes.
The middle-age to elderly Black Americans, they have a love and respect for the blues, but they do not want to hear set after set of nothing but blues like the White folks do;
They want to hear some blues, but mostly soul, funk, and like that with a little blues mixed in - a little Albert King/Muddy Waters and a lot of Tyrone Davis/Benny Lattimore. The music followed that pattern; it was very engaging even for me, one who would not at all mind hearing nothing but blues.
One of the singers, named Denise, she and the band did one number that even sounded like jazz to me. The band was Fantastic L-Roy and his Bulltproof Band..
The most prominent characterisitic of the venue is the perception of sincere friendliness, welcome, and relaxation.


7
 a somewhat less high-tech tool:

8
Guitars / Re: new (lower) saddle and lower nut exit helped much
« on: March 20, 2014, 02:59:02 PM »
Half-round strings don't cost a whole lot.  D'addario makes a pretty decent set.
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Thanks for the tip Danny,  I will check them out.

9
Guitars / Re: new (lower) saddle and lower nut exit helped much
« on: March 19, 2014, 07:09:56 PM »
probably I'll try the Finger Ease, expensive strings are not in the plan.

I appreciate all the posts.
Thanks.

10
Guitars / Re: new (lower) saddle and lower nut exit helped much
« on: March 17, 2014, 10:56:18 PM »
My brain keeps trying to change "antler bridge" to "alter bridge".  Curious about why you wanted to lower the string exit height. 

Can't tell for sure from the pic, but it doesn't look like the saddle positions are 'compensated'.  Usually a non-adjustable bridge has an angle to approximate intontation.  Maybe the angle is there, and just doesn't show in the pic.

Curious about those 'saddle sluts'.  Is that the technical term for rodeo groupies?



I lowered the nut exit height to enhance the pitch when fingering the top few frets.

The bridge is slanted some, with the first High E closer to the neck than the 6th low E.
The slant is less than it was with the taller bridge.  Don't know why less comp needed with lower string height, but I am getting same tone from 12th fret chime and fingering, that is how I position the bridge, for each string I get same tone form chiming over the 12th fret and fingering above the 12th fret.
we have some terminology issues. i think you mean the nut height as measured by the first fret string clearance. the nut exit height would be the height of the nut going towards the tuners, would not affect the pitch at the lower frets (the top frets are at the end of the neck closer to the bridge, the lower frets are closer to the nut).
fingering at the 12th fret isn't always meaningful for intonation, i have seen many people push the string really hard and that changes the intonation, so less angle is needed on the saddle for compensation because the finger pressure makes up for some of it. since the thinner strings bend easier, the apparent compensation is less, but only because of poor technique.

Usted es (or may I say Tu eres)
Me, I am definitely not a precision nut so I fret little about my poor technique.  I take seriously you advice about left hand finger approach to the strings - I am going to work on that to reduce that string buzzing against adjacent fingers. Thanks.  As for my imprecise terminology, I am untrained in the proper terminology so it somehow seemed to me that the frets usually higher from the ground might be called the higher frets, now it seems higher frets means higher in Hz not altitude. And I when I said nut exit I did mean the side of the nut toward the fingerboard, not toward the pegs.  Well here in my 68th winter I hope I am never too old to learn.  But I will say this one thing, I like the way my playing and singing sounds even while I do seek to improve it without changing it very much.
Now that I have put new strings on the thing, I wish I had got flatwounds, because the squeak of my fingers moving along the strings is a horrible sound that rasps my nerves.  I know some will say just don't touch the strings except to push down at such and such fret, but my style requires sometimes sliding my finger along a string, that behavior cannot be eliminated. 
Another finger-string buzz issue is with my picking/strumming hand - I am in the habit of leaving my finger tip close to the string after having plucked the string, now I am getting buzz from that! I guess the reason I keep the finger tip close by the string after having plucked it is to sometimes damp the string, so now I guess I must begin a new habit of damping softer tissue like the heel of my palm or maybe damping with some part of the left hand, but I just can't imagine that very well, especially when there is a desire to only damp that one string by its own self without damping other strings simultaneously. 
I really don't like all this technical stuff because it impinges on the free flow of my playing.  But, I guess that impingement plus improved results is better than continuance of unwanted sounds (aka noises).
   


11
Guitars / Re: new (lower) saddle and lower nut exit helped much
« on: March 17, 2014, 03:54:42 PM »
My brain keeps trying to change "antler bridge" to "alter bridge".  Curious about why you wanted to lower the string exit height. 

Can't tell for sure from the pic, but it doesn't look like the saddle positions are 'compensated'.  Usually a non-adjustable bridge has an angle to approximate intontation.  Maybe the angle is there, and just doesn't show in the pic.

Curious about those 'saddle sluts'.  Is that the technical term for rodeo groupies?

I lowered the nut exit height to enhance the pitch when fingering the top few frets.

The bridge is slanted some, with the first High E closer to the neck than the 6th low E.
The slant is less than it was with the taller bridge.  Don't know why less comp needed with lower string height, but I am getting same tone from 12th fret chime and fingering, that is how I position the bridge, for each string I get same tone form chiming over the 12th fret and fingering above the 12th fret.


12
Guitars / Re: new (lower) saddle and lower nut exit helped much
« on: March 17, 2014, 03:48:14 PM »
.....play chromatics on each string .....


Well I will have to google "chromatics" sometime soon because I don't know whata re "chromatics"  in this context.
I have a "chromatic" harp, for some reason they call it chromatic due to it has a button on one side that sort of bends the notes.


13
Guitars / new (lower) saddle and lower nut exit helped much
« on: March 16, 2014, 09:41:19 PM »
acoustic archtop adjustments made over the weekend
with wisdom gathered from several online posts I decided to lower the string exit height closer to fret height,
also i fashioned a new bridge from a white tail deer antler, the previous bridge I had carved from oak wood mill work and it was too tall;
the neew bridge is not as tall, plus the saddled, carved from a piece of beef bone, fits better (lower and more stably) into the slot in the new antler bridge.  I do not have proper tools to make this stuff;  I ended up putting 2 blades on my hack saw frame to make the slot on the antler bridge for the bone saddle. I think the nut is actually some type of plastic but I was too tired to make a nice antler nut yesterday - maybe soon I'll replace the plastic nut with a antler one.
any how, the guitar sounds a lot nicer now, louder, and truer pitch at the high frets.
My motivation for this little project was that after recently stringing with 12-56, heavier than previous strings, the new strings did not fit into the nut slots or the saddle slots, not they do, and the action is lower now too.
But I got me a problem with the heavier strings, I need to discipline my left hand fingers because now I a lot of string buzz, not from unwanted fret or pickup contact, but from the side of my fingers contacting the strings.  I've always had the issue but now it is worse -- I am not willing to thin down my fingers so I have lots of practice ahead of me to train my fingers to keep correct posture and not touch the strings to the side of the finger.  attached is a view of the new antler bridge (and old bone saddle) the view is looking down from the neck toward the bridge

http://burlapandblues.com/viewphoto.php?photo=1395004563.jpg

14
It almost looks like a humbucker and a floating off the pickguard.

Anybody besides D"Armond ever make pickups that floated on a post between neck and bridge areas?
I got one of those on my 1930s S S Stewart archtop, but unfortunately when I bought the guitar the slider post was missing and the p/u was screwed into place. (also unfortunately the guitar got caught in a basement flood and other than dumping the water I have done nothing with or for it since.)

15
Thanks for trying! 
Whatever it was, it sure was a beauty, no way I would carry a thing like that into the rough and tumble joints they used to play at on the westside and in Calumet City and like that.

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